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Tuesday, 21 July 2015
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Before you send your next email blast read this article on how to improve the success rate of that effort!

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Friday, 17 July 2015
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Who doesn’t like a good Ted Talk?  here are 4 worth your time.

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Monday, 13 July 2015
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Email marketing’s success has two critical components – 1) getting qualified recipients on the list and 2) delivering excellent content, offers or incentives to keep them engaged.  Here are 8 ways to achieve the first critical step.

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Friday, 19 June 2015
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Good points about the mistakes SMB owners tend to make however – #1 overpaying for websites – I’d disagree with.  Most SMB companies don’t invest in the right website design or DIY it resulting is a poor functioning site and lots of disappointment.  Spend wisely doesn’t mean spend a lot…Read more

 

 

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Wednesday, 17 June 2015
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brand-building

Great article by Scott David summarizing the 6 brand building best practices used by mega-brands that you can EASILY adopt for your company:
-Be customer obsessive
– Be values driven, purpose-led
-Deliver emotional content
-Tell signature stories
-Have gorgeous ideas
-Be relevant

Read on!

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Thursday, 14 May 2015
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My week was going along just fine until I set up my regular LinkedIn post and shared it with several of my Groups. I didn’t know I was one of the unlucky ones to be caught up in a random LinkedIn programming error that repeatedly re-sends a post literally hundreds of times within each Group.  Within 30 minutes of making my post I was getting hate mail and phone calls from Group members informing me that they were getting inundated by repeat notifications of my post.

As a LinkedIn Evangelist, someone who trains corporate teams and individuals on how to make the most out of LinkedIn, this wasn’t just a little egg on my face, it was damaging to my reputation. I worked to delete the post but that didn’t work to solve this particular programming error. I contacted LinkedIn, which doesn’t have a direct live Help Desk, and a day later was informed that this is a known issue (!!) and while “engineering” is working on it it’s not know when the issue will be resolved. So helpful.

In an effort to turn this unfortunate event into a positive, let me share with you some fixes when a LinkedIn post goes wrong for you. These are best done on your laptop.

The simplest fix.

If you’ve made a post to the general LinkedIn News feed (you’ve gone into Status and added a post) and decide you need to edit or delete it, hover your cursor over the upper right hand corner where the time stamp is – the greyed out time in either minutes, hours or days depending on how long ago you made the post. The drop down arrow will let you delete the post.

delete-updates-being-shared-on-linkedin

 

 

 

 

Deleting a post to a Group(s).

You may have shared your post, or someone else’s, to one or more of your Groups that you want to delete. You can do so in one of two ways.   You can find your post to the Group in the News feed and delete in the same way as described above, or if you go to the top of the News feed page, where you will see your profile picture and small dashboard with “Recent Activity” as one of the dropdowns. Choose that and you will see all the posts you’ve made to each Group and you can delete the post as described above.

Recent activity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The last resort.

When attempts to delete your post from a Group fail, as was the case for me due to this programming error, you’re best option is to leave the Group. This will stop further notifications of your post going to Group members. You can leave a Group by going into the Recent Activity section, described above, select the Group and when it opens to the Group’s page you’ll see the “Leave” button in the upper right hand corner. Or you can go into the Search box at the top of the page, select Groups in the drop down menu to the left of the Search box, type in the Group’s name and it will go to the Group’s page. Many Groups will allow you to rejoin…but you might want to wait a bit if you’ve had the reoccurring post nightmare I just had.

 

leave LI group

 

 

 

I hope you never have a LinkedIn nightmare but if you do, know that in addition to the Help Center and forums on-line the LinkedIn Help Desk will respond to your inquiry, just a day later.

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Tuesday, 12 May 2015
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Spot-on article by Jose Vasquez.  When sales are robust investing in marketing doesn’t seem necessary since “obviously we’re doing just fine”.  When sales (and revenue) fall marketing programs get cut because they are “an expense”.  Neither are true.  Read on….

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Wednesday, 06 May 2015
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Professional services firms often don’t see their business needing a dynamic (mobile friendly!!) website.  They also don’t invest effort in social media.  Both are essential to growth.  If your firm, small or large, isn’t investing in keeping your web presence current read on for the reasons why it should. Read on for more…

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Friday, 24 April 2015
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Conducting LinkedIn training today for a client’s Sales team. Sorry you can’t be there too but here’s a great article by Trent Dyrsmid at Groove Marketing to help you build leads with LinkedIn.

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Monday, 05 January 2015
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(The following is the full version of the recent Democrat and Chronicle article I wrote on Wegmans Conscious Capitalism principles, published January 4, 2015)

The Saturday before Christmas is typically one of the busiest shopping days at Wegmans.  I purposely arrived early so I could get in and out as painlessly as possible.  As soon as I walked through the door I felt something was different.  There was electricity. A real energy. Maybe it was anxiety, or maybe it was excitement.  Staff was buzzing around, chatting among themselves, big smiles, robust pats on the back, pumping handshakes and looks of determination.  When I mentioned to someone in produce that a scale ran out of tape, three employees jumped to fix it.  (‘These folks are on fire!’, I thought).

When I saw Mary in her usual spot in the floral department I said I could tell the army was ready for the battle. “Oh no”, she said, “don’t you know? Danny, Nicole and Colleen are coming at 9:30!  They’re going to be dressed up in holiday outfits, and they’ll sing us carols. You should stay!” (No way, I thought… it’ll be madness!).

Throughout the store employees were fussing, cleaning and falling over themselves to help customers. “Finding everything okay?”  “Can I help you with anything?”  One chef wiped a stainless counter in front of the food bar so much I wondered if he’d wear through the finish.  The young lady at the coffee bar nervously sputtered, “I’m afraid I’ll forget how to make a cappuccino if He asks me for one”.

It was as if a king was coming.   And in fact THEIR King was coming …  with his family, to sing them songs and spread some holiday cheer.  I’m guessing the visit is part of the company ethos to be close to the employees as much as possible and to treat them well. Of course it also gives the ownership some exposure to their customers. But it was the employees knocking themselves out for the owners, the Wegmans family, that I noticed.

So what does this have to do with Marketing?  As a customer, I found myself sporting a huge smile and making friendly comments to fellow customers because the energy was so contagious.  As a marketer, I knew the inside story. The pride the Wegmans employees have for their company was striking and truly affecting how business was being done that day.  The esprit de corps translated into superior customer service, a feeling of belonging even as a customer.  Sure, I could have gone to the Public Market and bought the produce, cheese and bread I needed for less, but, hey, Wegmans provides an experience and convenience I was willing to pay more for.   That’s the power of marketing at its core. 

If you own a business you owe it to yourself and your company to read Conscious Capitalism by John Mackey, the co-founder of Whole Foods and Rajendra Sisodia, Professor of Global Business and Whole Foods Research Scholar at Babson College.   In the book, Mackey sites Wegmans several times as a poster child for how running a business with the principles of Conscious Capitalism can catapult a business forward.  The concept is built on 4 simple principles:  having a Higher Purpose than just making money, having a Stakeholder Orientation that recognizes their value, embracing Conscious Leadership by having a vision and inspiring others to join in, and creating Conscious Culture that cultivates the values, principles and practices of the business.  The book shows how adhering to these guiding tenets will yield greater returns for you, your customers, your employees, your suppliers, your investors and your community than running your business based only on the bottom dollar.

According to a recent AdAge study, only 41% of companies surveyed have a holistic and strategic approach to employee engagement.  Perhaps this is, in part, because senior managers don’t see how valuable excited, enthusiastic employees can be to a company’s business.  They don’t encourage HR and Marketing to work together to build the camaraderie and shared values to take employee involvement to a higher level. But Wegmans does.

Saturday’s event went beyond an HR tactic.  It was a principle voiced by the owners that resonated through every employee I saw:  “Every day you get our best”… our best as people who are business owners and managers who care about our employees, suppliers, investors, community, and, of course, customers.
Well done, Wegmans – family, leaders and employees.